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A Guide to Overcoming Alcohol Dependence

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Those who start drinking recreationally or socially may find themselves drinking more significant amounts over time. Alcohol is easily accessible and legal in most countries throughout the world, but it may be as harmful and addictive as illegal substances. Individuals who start drinking recreationally or socially will eventually begin to drink more and will feel unable to relax or enjoy themselves without the presence of alcohol. 

Fortunately, an alcohol dependence recovery process will help someone overcome this. If you feel that alcohol has overrun your life, you must reach out for help. The longer you allow the problem to fester, the harder it will be to overcome.

Alcohol Abuse Versus Alcohol Dependence

Those who frequently abuse alcohol may become physically or psychologically dependent on the drug. These individuals, however, will benefit from treatment for alcoholism recovery. Binge drinkers will be fine going weeks or months without a sip of alcohol, but when they do consume alcohol, they have trouble stopping themselves from drinking too much. This type of abuse may cause adverse consequences, which include social, health, and legal problems.

Dependency on alcohol is different than you might imagine, and those with an alcohol use disorder (AUD) will have intense cravings that cloud their thinking in daily situations. The individuals may be unable to focus at work or in school and could experience psychological or physical withdrawal without alcohol. The combination of withdrawal symptoms and cravings will lead to chronic alcohol users to drink at inappropriate times, such as before work.

Those addicted to alcohol need substantial amounts to feel drunk, and as their tolerance increases due to frequent use, they will have trouble controlling their intake. One more drink can spell disaster and lead to several more. Those with limited funds may choose to pay for alcohol instead of food, rent, or electricity, while those with high incomes may forget to make payments, drink, and drive, or miss social gatherings. 

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Overcoming Alcohol Dependence

Overcoming alcohol dependence may be a long and bumpy road, and at times could feel impossible, but it can be done with the right help. If you are ready to stop drinking, and you’re willing to get the support necessary, you will recover from alcohol dependence. You don’t have hit rock bottom and feel powerless to make this decision. Whether you want to stop drinking altogether or cut back, this article aims to help you with that.

You must evaluate the costs and benefits of drinking – is it worth the price? Some benefits may be that it helps you forget your problems, brings you joy, or it’s relaxing after a stressful day, but would your relationships improve if you stopped? Would you feel better mentally, and physically? If it causes more harm than good, you must set goals and prepare for the change you are about to make. From that point, you must figure out how you want to accomplish these goals. 

The first option you must consider, however, is to enter treatment. If you consume excessive amounts of alcohol, you must get treatment. Alcohol withdrawal may cause severe symptoms that could be fatal without the right treatment. After detox, you should discuss options with a medical professional about what benefits your lifestyle. 

Sources

National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK). (1970, January 1). ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE AND HARMFUL ALCOHOL USE. from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK65500/

National Institute on Drug Abuse. (n.d.). Alcohol. from https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/alcohol

Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD). (2020, January 16). from https://medlineplus.gov/alcoholusedisorderaud.html

Alcohol and Tolerance – Alcohol Alert No. 28-1995. (n.d.). from https://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa28.htm

(UK), N. C. G. C. (1970, January 1). Acute Alcohol Withdrawal. from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK65581

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